Archives

Permalink

I read Al Gore's The Assault on Reason last week. I thought it was a pretty good analysis of Where America Went Wrong and why we're in the pickle that we're in. Gore places a lot of the blame at the feet of the current administration. However, he also drives home the point that the administration ultimately derives its power from the electorate--which means that we, the people, are ultimately responsible and need to step up to the plate of setting things right. Gore believes that something has gone awry in our political process and national dialog. Specifically, that the rise of television has reduced political conversation to one-way 30-second sound bites, which are prone to appeals to emotion rather than cohesive and intelligent debate. He hopes that the dawning of the Internet will at least partially reverse this effect by allowing anyone to contribute to the national dialog.

On a related note, in a recent poll of Iowa voters (the first state that will have a primary election), Al Gore has a wide lead over both Hillary and Obama--even though he's said he has no plans to run. I'm hoping he'll decide to enter the race.

Share

3 comments to

  • “He hopes that the dawning of the Internet will at least partially reverse this effect by allowing anyone to contribute to the national dialog.”

    Has he ever actually _used_ the internet? I agree with his comments on TV, but if Teh Interwebz are our best hope, I think the future is grim.

    AE

    • Has he ever actually _used_ the internet? I agree with his comments on TV, but if Teh Interwebz are our best hope, I think the future is grim.

      His thinking is that, on the Internet, Joe American can create a zany political critique on YouTube and, if it strikes a chord, it’ll spread like wildfire through the American consciousness. He’s not thinking that *most* people will meaningfully contribute, but that it’s critical that anyone *can* contribute.

Leave a Reply